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Intravenous Vitamin C for Cancer

May 12, 2015 -

New research has found that Vitamin C has helped cancer patients live nearly 4 times longer than those cancer patients not given Vitamin C. These high doses were administered in the form of sodium ascorbate and given both orally and intravenously.

For more than 20 years, the Hoffman Center has been using high-dose vitamin C drips in its cancer support protocols. The initial impetus was from Linus Pauling who, together with Ewan Cameron, pioneered the use of high-dose C in cancer in the 1960s. Now, there’s new interest in this modality for fighting cancer based on new, exciting research under way at the National Institutes of Health.

When delivered in a “drip,” much higher concentrations of C can be attained. At these higher concentrations, vitamin C has different characteristics than if given orally. While oral vitamin C boosts immunity and assists tissue repair, it is too weak to do much to kill or inhibit cancer cells. But at high doses delivered directly into the bloodstream, it may act to increase levels of hydrogen peroxide deep in the tissues where cancer cells lurk. Peroxide-mediated killing is one of the white blood cells’ key mechanisms for fighting infection and cancer. Research currently under way has shown that high concentrations of vitamin C can stop the growth or even kill a wide range of cancer cells. Only intravenous administration of vitamin C can deliver the high doses found to be effective against cancer.

To learn more about intravenous vitamin C for cancer CLICK HERE.

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